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EcoWatch

Mar 1 '12
A new report published in the online journal PLoS ONE, analyzing  water consumption in 405 river basins around the world, found that water  scarcity impacts at least 2.7 billion people for at least one month  each year.
“Freshwater is a scarce resource; its annual availability is limited  and demand is growing,” said Arjen Hoekstra, professor in water  management at the University of Twente and lead author of the report, Global Monthly Water Scarcity: Blue Water Footprints versus Blue Water Availability. “There  are many places in the world where serious water depletion takes  place—rivers running dry and dropping lake and groundwater levels.” 
The new assessment of global water scarcity tracked month-to-month  variability in water flows and accounted for the flows needed to sustain  critical ecological functions. Through detailed analysis of the total  water consumption, or depletion, rather than water withdrawals, the  study highlights how the water used to grow crops, sustain industry and  provide drinking water has in many places exceeded sustainable levels of  water use.  
To learn more about water scarcity and humanity’s water footprint, click here. 

A new report published in the online journal PLoS ONE, analyzing water consumption in 405 river basins around the world, found that water scarcity impacts at least 2.7 billion people for at least one month each year.

“Freshwater is a scarce resource; its annual availability is limited and demand is growing,” said Arjen Hoekstra, professor in water management at the University of Twente and lead author of the report, Global Monthly Water Scarcity: Blue Water Footprints versus Blue Water Availability. “There are many places in the world where serious water depletion takes place—rivers running dry and dropping lake and groundwater levels.” 

The new assessment of global water scarcity tracked month-to-month variability in water flows and accounted for the flows needed to sustain critical ecological functions. Through detailed analysis of the total water consumption, or depletion, rather than water withdrawals, the study highlights how the water used to grow crops, sustain industry and provide drinking water has in many places exceeded sustainable levels of water use.  

To learn more about water scarcity and humanity’s water footprint, click here

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