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EcoWatch

Posts tagged asthma

Jul 11 '14
Asthma Cases Increase as Cities Continue to Ignore Federal Ozone Standards
“The majority of people living in Dallas, TX, have never breathed legally clean air, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.”
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/11/asthma-federal-ozone-standards/

Asthma Cases Increase as Cities Continue to Ignore Federal Ozone Standards

“The majority of people living in Dallas, TX, have never breathed legally clean air, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.”

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/11/asthma-federal-ozone-standards/

Apr 5 '13
Why You Need to Ditch Dryer Sheets
Unfortunately, dryer sheets can contain some harmful chemicals—including hidden fragrance chemicals that lots of people are sensitive to—that vent off into the air we breath and rub off on our clothes and then onto our skin.

Why You Need to Ditch Dryer Sheets

Unfortunately, dryer sheets can contain some harmful chemicals—including hidden fragrance chemicals that lots of people are sensitive to—that vent off into the air we breath and rub off on our clothes and then onto our skin.

Mar 29 '13
Lower Tailpipe Emissions Will Lead to Cleaner Air, More Jobs
“The path from a car’s tailpipe to our lungs is surprisingly short, and more than one in three Americans live in areas where air pollution levels exceed at least one federal limit.”

Lower Tailpipe Emissions Will Lead to Cleaner Air, More Jobs

“The path from a car’s tailpipe to our lungs is surprisingly short, and more than one in three Americans live in areas where air pollution levels exceed at least one federal limit.”

Feb 1 '13

How are Children Impacted by Environmental Contaminants?
The report shows trends for contaminants in air, water, food and soil that may affect children, concentrations of contaminants in the bodies of children and…

How are Children Impacted by Environmental Contaminants?

The report shows trends for contaminants in air, water, food and soil that may affect children, concentrations of contaminants in the bodies of children and…

Apr 23 '12
Cleaners Hall of Shame Reveals Hidden Hazards
“Cleaning your home can come at a high price—cancer-causing chemicals in the air, an asthma attack from fumes or serious skin burns from an accidental spill,” said Jane Houlihan, EWG
To Learn More, CLICK HERE.

Cleaners Hall of Shame Reveals Hidden Hazards

“Cleaning your home can come at a high price—cancer-causing chemicals in the air, an asthma attack from fumes or serious skin burns from an accidental spill,” said Jane Houlihan, EWG

To Learn More, CLICK HERE.

Apr 3 '12
It’s like some in the gas industry are living in a different universe from the rest of us, when it comes to the risks from shale gas extraction via fracking. Call it the “Spin Zone.”
At a Wall Street Journal conference last week, Chesapeake Energy CEO Aubrey McClendon told attendees he’s unaware of any problems resulting from the thousands of fracking wells drilled in Fort Worth, Texas in recent years. McClendon peevishly referred to the fracking-related air pollution concerns I raised at the conference as “environmental nonsense.”To read more, click here. 

It’s like some in the gas industry are living in a different universe from the rest of us, when it comes to the risks from shale gas extraction via fracking. Call it the “Spin Zone.”

At a Wall Street Journal conference last week, Chesapeake Energy CEO Aubrey McClendon told attendees he’s unaware of any problems resulting from the thousands of fracking wells drilled in Fort Worth, Texas in recent years. McClendon peevishly referred to the fracking-related air pollution concerns I raised at the conference as “environmental nonsense.”

To read more, click here

Feb 29 '12
On Feb. 29, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Midwest Generation announced the  planned retirement of the Fisk and Crawford coal plants, two of the  oldest and dirtiest coal-fired power plants in the nation located in the  heart of Chicago’s Southwest side. According to an agreement signed by  Midwest Generation, the Clean Power Coalition, and the City of Chicago,  the Fisk coal plant in Pilsen will retire in 2012 and the Crawford coal  plant in Little Village will retire by 2014. As part of the Chicago  Clean Power Coalition, Sierra Club has worked with an incredible group  of local community organizations to retire these coal plants due to the  dangerous health impacts on the families of Chicago.
“Today’s announcement of the retirement of the Fisk and Crawford coal  plants is a triumph for Chicago families,” said Sierra Club’s Executive  Director Michael Brune. “These old and dirty plants have been polluting  two thriving Chicago neighborhoods for over 100 years. The effort to  end pollution from the plants has been an uphill battle for a very long  time. This announcement is the culmination of many years of hard work by  local families and concerned residents in Pilsen and Little Village,  and this victory belongs to them. Pollution from these coal plants has  been making local residents sick since 1903, contributing to asthma  attacks, respiratory illnesses and other health problems. This is giant  leap in our work to move America beyond coal.”
To read more, click here.

On Feb. 29, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Midwest Generation announced the planned retirement of the Fisk and Crawford coal plants, two of the oldest and dirtiest coal-fired power plants in the nation located in the heart of Chicago’s Southwest side. According to an agreement signed by Midwest Generation, the Clean Power Coalition, and the City of Chicago, the Fisk coal plant in Pilsen will retire in 2012 and the Crawford coal plant in Little Village will retire by 2014. As part of the Chicago Clean Power Coalition, Sierra Club has worked with an incredible group of local community organizations to retire these coal plants due to the dangerous health impacts on the families of Chicago.

“Today’s announcement of the retirement of the Fisk and Crawford coal plants is a triumph for Chicago families,” said Sierra Club’s Executive Director Michael Brune. “These old and dirty plants have been polluting two thriving Chicago neighborhoods for over 100 years. The effort to end pollution from the plants has been an uphill battle for a very long time. This announcement is the culmination of many years of hard work by local families and concerned residents in Pilsen and Little Village, and this victory belongs to them. Pollution from these coal plants has been making local residents sick since 1903, contributing to asthma attacks, respiratory illnesses and other health problems. This is giant leap in our work to move America beyond coal.”

To read more, click here.